INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY – CURRICULUM AND CLASS DESCRIPTIONS

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INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY – CURRICULUM AND CLASS DESCRIPTIONS

The Industrial Electricity program prepares individuals to install, operate, maintain, and repair electrically-energized systems such as electric power wiring and industrial process control systems.  The electrical field is one of the fastest growing occupations and offers relatively high earnings.  Students who graduate from the program at State Technical College of Missouri are prepared for jobs in electrical construction, electrical maintenance, and/or industrial automation.  Employment opportunities may be found in schools; hospitals; manufacturing; federal and state government; building complexes; and residential, commercial, and industrial construction.

Industrial Electricity Associate of Applied Science degree students may choose either the Construction Option or the Automated Controls Technician Option.  An Electromechanical One-Year Certificate is also offered.  These options and the certificate allow students the flexibility to choose the electrical field that best suits their individual career goals.

The program provides extensive hands-on practical education from instructors who have worked in the electrical field.  Courses in electricity, residential and commercial wiring, motor controls, power distribution, blueprint reading, and general studies develop the competencies of both construction and maintenance electricians.  Safety and electrical code requirements are stressed in all classes.  All students receive CPR, First Aid, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 10-hour training.

Students in the Construction Option develop advanced skills required of electricians through course work in industrial wiring and alternative energy systems.  Students will also gain hands-on industry experience through an internship.

In the Automated Controls Technician Option, students receive instruction on Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs), human machine interface, and robotics.

The Industrial Electricity program is accredited by the Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering (ATMAE).

It is a graduation requirement of the Industrial Electricity (IEL) program for students to earn a grade of “C” or better in all “Core Curriculum” and “Program Requirements” courses.

Program Mission

The mission of the Industrial Electricity program is to provide students the knowledge and technical skills required to succeed in the electrical construction, electrical maintenance, and/or industrial automation industries.

Program Goals

The goals of the program are to provide the opportunity for students to develop:

  • Awareness of potential hazards and safety practices required to prevent injuries and material damage.
  • Technical and critical thinking skills required to install, troubleshoot, and repair electrical and related systems in residential, commercial, and industrial settings.
  • Attitudes, ethics, and communication skills that enhance the ability to secure and maintain increasingly meaningful employment in their chosen professions.

 

  CORE CURRICULUM  
      Credit Hours
IEL 105 Codes and Standards I 2
IEL 113 Basic Motor Controls 2
IEL 117 Circuitry Fundamentals with Lab 4
IEL 125 Codes and Standards II 3
IEL 130 Residential Wiring Theory with Lab 6
IEL 150 Blueprint Reading and Project Development 3
IEL 180 Industrial Motor Controls 4
IEL 200 Commercial Wiring Theory with Lab 6
IEL 211 Power Distribution 2
IEL 260 Motors and Generators 2
    SUB-TOTAL 34
     
  GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS  
General Education Requirements 19
   
May Not Include:  
ASC 104 Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab I 4
ASC 106 Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab II 4
  SUB-TOTAL 19
       
    PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS  
       

Automated Controls Technician Option
IEL 256 Basic Programmable Logic Controllers 5
IEL 262 Mechanical and Fluid Power Transmission 3
IEL 277 Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers 5
IEL 285 Human Machine Interface and Robotic Fundamentals 5
    SUB-TOTAL 18
       
OR      
       
Construction Option
IEL 122 Alternative Energy Systems 2
IEL 240 Industrial Electricity Internship I 6
IEL 250 Industrial Wiring Theory with Lab 6
IEL 282 Industrial Electricity Capstone 4
    SUB-TOTAL 18
       

 

    GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS    
COM 125 Job Search Strategies 1  
    SUB-TOTAL 1  
       
    It is a graduation requirement of the Industrial Electricity (IEL) program for students to earn a grade of “C” or better in all “Core Curriculum” and “Program Requirements” courses.  
         
    PROGRAM TOTAL 72  

 

INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICITY

Classification of Instructional Programs - 46.0302

Electromechanical One-Year Certificate

    CORE CURRICULUM  
      Credit Hours
IEL 105 Codes and Standards I 2
IEL 113 Basic Motor Controls 2
IEL 117 Circuitry Fundamentals with Lab 4
IEL 125 Codes and Standards II 3
IEL 130 Residential Wiring Theory with Lab 6
IEL 150 Blueprint Reading and Project Development 3
    SUB-TOTAL 20
         
    GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS  
General Education Requirements 6
   
Must Include:  
Three credit hours from Area 1. Oral & Written Communication 3
AND  
Three credit hours from Area 5. Technical Literacy 3
    SUB-TOTAL 6
       
    PROGRAM REQUIREMENT  
MAT 051 Introductory Algebra 4
    SUB-TOTAL 4
       
    GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS  
COM 125 Job Search Strategies 1
    SUB-TOTAL 1
       
    It is a graduation requirement of the Industrial Electricity (IEL) program for students to earn a grade of “C” or better in all “Core Curriculum” and “Program Requirement” courses.  
       
    PROGRAM TOTAL 31

IEL  105  Codes and Standards I.  This course begins the study of electrical industry standards with the development of terminology, then builds on students’ developing experience to form proper interpretations of the National Electrical Code (NEC) as it pertains to wiring methods. Students will earn Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 10-hour, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and first aid certifications.  2 credit hours.

IEL  113  Basic Motor Controls.  This course introduces key concepts in electro-magnetic theory.  These concepts are then developed and applied to the use of various devices commonly used in the electrical field such as coils, relays, solenoids, contactors, motor starters and their applications.  Schematics are drawn and trainers are wired using the above components.  Applications of AC/DC motors, switchgear control motors and switch-motors are discussed.  Prerequisite:  IEL 117 with a grade of “C” or better.  2 credit hours.

IEL  117  Circuitry Fundamentals with Lab.  This course introduces and develops the concepts necessary for understanding the use of electrical components and circuitry.  The first half of the semester is devoted to DC, the second to AC.  4 credit hours.

IEL  122  Alternative Energy Systems.  This course teaches how to install and maintain alternative energy electrical equipment. Students also gain hands-on experience using electrical metering equipment and sensors, and in electrical preventive maintenance.  2 credit hours.

IEL  125  Codes and Standards II.  This course familiarizes students with the National Electrical Code (NEC), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), American National Standards Institute (ANSI), and other related codes and standards that have been established for personal safety and for safe and proper residential, commercial, and industrial electrical installations.  Prerequisite:  IEL 105 with a grade of “C” or better.  3 credit hours.

IEL  130  Residential Wiring Theory with Lab.  This course introduces basic electrical wiring methods, simple circuits, and residential devices and their uses in the electrical trade.  The National Electrical Code is integrated into all lab projects.  Prerequisite:  IEL 150 with a grade of “C” or better.  Corequisite:  IEL 113 with a grade of “C” or better.  6 credit hours.

IEL  150  Blueprint Reading and Project Development.  This course is designed to develop students’ ability to draw and interpret electrical blueprints.  The fundamentals of electrical wiring schematics and diagrams are covered.  This course will also cover sizing, ordering, load centers, switch gears, and other electrical equipment.  Students will use their designed electrical blueprints to develop job estimates.  Corequisite:  IEL 117 with a grade of “C” or better.  3 credit hours.

IEL  180  Industrial Motor Controls.  This course will continue to build an understanding and implementation of schematic and ladder logic concepts as they apply to industrial control systems. Programmable logic and frequency drive systems will be introduced and implemented as part of hands-on training. Troubleshooting of these systems will utilize simulations and hands on device repair or replacement.  Prerequisite:  IEL 113 with a grade of “C” or better.  4 credit hours.

IEL  200  Commercial Wiring Theory with Lab.  This course introduces commercial wiring methods and materials.  Included are conduit bending and threading, flexible metal conduit, armored cable, and low voltage control.  The National Electrical Code is integrated into all lab projects.  Prerequisite:  IEL 130 with a grade of “C” or better.  6 credit hours.

IEL  211  Power Distribution.  This course teaches AC transformer fundamentals, an introduction of switchgears, a review of AC characteristics, and a familiarization of various types of AC transformers. Power transformers and various types of special purpose transformers are taught along with ratios, losses, efficiency, and engineering calculations. Single-phase and three-phase systems and various configurations of the delta and wye connections are covered. Students perform hands-on lab work with wye and delta applications.   Prerequisite:  IEL 113 with a grade of “C” or better.  2 credit hours.

IEL  240  Industrial Electricity Internship I.  This internship is comprised of 320 hours of work experience as a construction or manufacturing electrician and must include a variety of tasks typical to that field.  The student will be required to work eight hours per day for eight weeks or the equivalent.  A training agreement between the employer, the student, and the college is required.  The student will submit a weekly summary of tasks performed.  Prerequisite:  IEL 130 with a grade of “C” or better.  6 credit hours.

IEL  250  Industrial Wiring Theory with Lab.  Through a combination of classroom and lab experiences, students will learn wiring methods, systems, and materials unique to industrial and large commercial electrical construction. Included are electric and hydraulic conduit bending, power conduit threading, fire alarm systems, power factor correction, and system harmonics.  The National Electrical Code is integrated into all lab projects.  Prerequisite:  IEL 200 with a grade of “C” or better.  6 credit hours.

IEL  256  Basic Programmable Logic Controllers.  This course introduces programmable control systems as they are applied in industrial processes.  Topics covered include electrical safety; PLC hardware; interfacing input and output devices; interfacing electro-pneumatic devices; and programming timers, counters, and math functions.  Basic programming of Allen Bradley-Rockwell Automation software and programmable components is taught.  Prerequisite:  IEL 113 with a grade of “C” or better.  5 credit hours.

IEL  260  Motors and Generators.  This course is an overview in the theory and operation of both AC and DC motors and generators.  Topics include the various types of motors and generators, the characteristics of each, theories of operation, and applications in industry.   Prerequisite:  IEL 113 with a grade of “C” or better.  2 credit hours.

IEL  262  Mechanical and Fluid Power Transmission.  This course includes mechanical power transmission topics such as brakes, clutches, gears, chains and sprockets, couplings, shafts, and cams and bearings. Hydraulic topics include liquid properties, cylinders, motors, pumps, valves, and math for proper sizing of components. Pneumatic topics include physical principles, cylinders, motors, compressors, and control valves. Simulation of circuits will be performed before any laboratory work is done. Laboratory exercises are provided to enhance classroom topics.  Prerequisite:  IEL 117 with a grade of “C” or better.  3 credit hours.

IEL  277  Advanced Programmable Logic Controllers.  This advanced course teaches students to design and apply programmable control systems of increased complexity.  Industrial automation processes, motion control, and human machine interface (HMI) applications are included. Advanced programming of Allen Bradley-Rockwell Automation software and programmable components is taught.  Prerequisite:  IEL 256 with a grade of “C” or better.  5 credit hours.

IEL  282  Industrial Electricity Capstone.  This course is project oriented. The students are required to design, develop, and troubleshoot a project to be constructed in the industrial electricity lab. This project will incorporate and integrate a variety of systems and issues studied during the course of the program. The project will be team based. Students will construct and wire components necessary to make the project a working machine. Students may have to improvise on some of the materials and methods needed to complete the project. Students will evaluate the final project and compose a written report as well as a wiring diagram and instructions on how to operate the finished product.   4 credit hours.

IEL  285  Human Machine Interface and Robotic Fundamentals.  This course will focus on the development and integration of human machine interface (HMI) and robotic systems commonly used in conjunction with programmable logic controllers (PLCs). Industrial automation processes, motion control, HMI, and robotic applications are included. The primary focus will be the application of HMI, robotic devices, and motion control hardware to PLC systems.  Prerequisite:  IEL 256 with a grade of “C” or better.  Corequisite:  IEL 277 with a grade of “C” or better.  5 credit hours.

IEL  299  Special Topics in Industrial Electricity.  Special Topics in Industrial Electricity (IEL) may include instruction on topics not covered in other IEL courses.  Topics covered in other IEL courses may also be covered in more depth in this special topics course.  Projects may be undertaken in any area related to the major program with credit hours determined by the level and amount of involvement.  The minimum involvement required for one credit is 30 contact hours.  The specific topic(s), objectives, plan of instruction, and evaluation criteria must be documented in the syllabus; approved by the Department/Division Chair; and filed in the Academic Records Office.  Students may complete more than one Special Topics course, provided that the credits earned in this manner do not exceed a total of four (4) credits.  1-4 credit hours.