AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY- CURRICULUM AND CLASS DESCRIPTIONS

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AUTOMOTIVE  TECHNOLOGY- CURRICULUM AND CLASS DESCRIPTIONS

State Technical College of Missouri offers the person who wants to become a skilled automotive service technician the opportunity to work in one of the best-equipped shops in Missouri under the supervision of competent, thoroughly trained instructors.  The Automotive Technology program at State Technical College of Missouri is one of only a select few in the country that meets the strict industry standards required for National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) accreditation.  As a result of its commitment to quality automotive service technology training, State Technical College of Missouri instructors are Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) certified Automobile Technicians in the areas they teach.  The Automotive Technology program is also accredited by the Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering (ATMAE).

Enrollment in the Automotive Technology program is limited and students are selected for this program on a competitive basis.  Contact the Office of Admissions for the specific application requirements and deadline.

Students have four Automotive Technology Associate of Applied Science degree options from which to choose.  All options fully educate students in the fundamentals of the automobile field so that they have a background that supports advancement within the industry or that allows them to begin a business of their own.  The General Option includes instruction on all the systems of conventional gasoline powered vehicles.  The Electric/Hybrid Vehicle Option includes instruction on systems specific to electric and hybrid powered vehicles.  The Light-Duty Diesel Option includes instruction on light-duty diesel engines.  The High Performance Option provides training in the modification and construction of performance vehicles used in motorsports.  If time allows, students in the General Option may elect to take additional courses in welding, high performance modifications, electric/hybrid systems, and diesel engines to develop additional skills and should consult their advisors if they wish to do so.

Students may also choose to pursue a one-year technical certificate in General Automotive or Maintenance and Light Repair.  Automotive Technology certificate students receive supportive training in related fields such as math, metal work, and communications.

The Automotive Technology program contributes to the green economy by teaching students to repair and maintain vehicles that may otherwise be discarded.  Instruction on hybrid vehicles and alternative fuels is also included in the program.  During their education, students use computers to diagnose and correct problems that affect automotive

emission systems to help reduce the carbon footprint.  The program is recognized by the Mobile Air Conditioning Society (MACS) as complying with the 1990 United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Air Act requirements for refrigerant recovery and recycling to protect the environment.   Solvents and other chemicals are recycled to help reduce water, air, and soil contamination.

Students who graduate with an Associate of Applied Science degree in Automotive Technology may pursue a second Associate of Applied Science degree in Automotive Collision Technology.  Basic Welding (WLT 128) or ACT Welding (WLT 151) is a prerequisite for Automotive Technology students who wish to obtain a second degree or certificate in Automotive Collision Technology.  The courses for the second Associate of Applied Science degree in Automotive Collision Technology will be offered in the same sequence and semester that they are being taught for the full-time Automotive Collision Technology program.  The second Associate of Applied Science degree in Automotive Collision Technology may be completed in two semesters if scheduling permits.

It is a graduation requirement of the Automotive Technology (AMT) program for students to earn a grade of “C” or better in all “Core Curriculum” and “Program Requirements” courses.

Program Mission

The mission of the Automotive Technology program is to prepare students with the higher education, technical, and interpersonal skills needed for employment in the challenging and highly technical career of Automotive Technology with the foundation for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) Master Technician Certification.

Program Goals

The goals of the program are to provide the opportunity for students to develop:

  • Effective communication skills.
  • Critical thinking skills for troubleshooting and diagnostic techniques.
  • Technical knowledge and understanding necessary for applied tasks in the eight Automotive Service Excellence (ASE) areas.
  • Computer skills to find and research automotive data using multiple software databases and via the Internet.
  • Skills in repairing and modifying automotive systems as appropriate for each program option.
  • Personal social traits, which are essential for the successful automotive technician.
  • A professional attitude toward the automotive industry including continuing education.
    CORE CURRICULUM  
      Credit Hours
AMT 101 Automotive Electrical/Electronics I 4
AMT 120 Project Management 3
AMT 145 Automotive Engine Mechanical 5
AMT 205 Automotive Brake Systems 4
AMT 206 Automotive Suspension and Steering 4
AMT 253 Automotive Drivetrains and Axles 9
Optional:      
AMT 191 Internship (Optional) (6)
HEO 151 Basic Commercial Driver License (1)
HEO 152 Basic Commercial Driver License Lab (1)
SUB-TOTAL 29-37

 

 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS
General Education Requirements 19
May Not Include:
ASC 104 Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab I 4
ASC 106 Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab II 4
NST 101 Network Fundamentals 3
SUB-TOTAL 19
 

 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
General Option
AMT 138 Automotive Electrical/Electronics II 6
AMT 214 Automotive Electrical/Electronics III 9
AMT 207 Heating/Air Conditioning 5
Optional:      
PMT 196 Machining Essentials (3)
SUB-TOTAL 20-23
   
OR    
 
Electric/Hybrid Vehicle Option
AMT 138 Automotive Electrical/Electronics II 6
OR
AMT 243 Light-Duty Diesel Engines and Control Systems 6
AMT 207 Heating/Air Conditioning 5
AMT 214 Automotive Electrical/Electronics III 9
AMT 270 Electric/Hybrid Drive Systems 6
SUB-TOTAL 26
 
OR    
High Performance Option
AMT 138 Automotive Electrical/Electronics II 6
AMT 262 High Performance Drivetrains 5
AMT 265 Performance Suspension Design 5
ACT 200 Sheet Metal Fabrication 3
WLT 128 Basic Welding 3
OR
WLT 151 ACT Welding 3
WLT 225 Welding and Fabrication for High Performance Vehicles 2
PMT 196 Machining Essentials 3
SUB-TOTAL 27
 
OR    
    Light-Duty Diesel Option  
AMT 207 Heating/Air Conditioning 5
AMT 214 Automotive Electrical/Electronics III 9
AMT 243 Light-Duty Diesel Engines and Control Systems 6
WLT 128 Basic Welding 3
OR
WLT 151 ACT Welding 3
Optional:      
PMT 196 Machining Essentials (3)
SUB-TOTAL 23-26

 

 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
COM 125 Job Search Strategies 1
SEM 135 Ford Maintenance & Light Repair (MLR) Service Training Seminar NC
OR
SEM 145 Subaru-U Training Seminar NC
SUB-TOTAL 1
It is a graduation requirement of the Automotive Technology (AMT) program for students to earn a grade of “C” or better in all “Core Curriculum” and “Program Requirements” courses.
       
    PROGRAM TOTAL 69-84

 

AMT  101                Automotive Electrical/Electronics I.  Theory/application of the operation and repair of electrical systems generally associated with the automotive engine. Includes the discussion and use of specific hand tools and equipment. Safety is stressed.  4 credit hours.

 

AMT  120        Project Management.  This course is designed to give the student the opportunity to handle problems facing management, better equipping him/her for the automotive technician career.  Some topics discussed include:  keeping accurate records, merchandising, writing repair orders, figuring flat rate time, handling customer relations, and terminology as applied to the automotive industry.  3 credit hours.

 

AMT  138   Automotive Electrical/Electronics II.  Application/service of electrical systems associated with the automotive engine.  Theory/application/operation and diagnosis of automotive fuel and emission systems.  Emphasis is put on an individual component operation, advanced system diagnostics, failure analysis, and proper service procedures.  Safety is stressed.  Prerequisite:  AMT 101 with a grade of “C” or better.  6 credit hours.

 

AMT  145      Automotive Engine Mechanical.  Theory/Construction/Operation of the internal combustion engine.  Emphasis is put on proper diagnosis, failure analysis, and using the proper service procedures according to manufacturers specifications.  Safety is stressed.  5 credit hours.

 

AMT  154  Automotive Electrical Systems.  Construction, operation and servicing of the electrical, air conditioning, and safety systems of the automobile.  Battery, starting and generating systems, and power accessories are also covered.  6 credit hours.

 

AMT  191  Internship (Optional).  The optional internship is a paid work experience in the automotive industry that develops and reinforces the student’s skills.  The minimum hours worked will be 320 hours.  Only Associate of Applied Science degree students who have successfully completed at least 12 credit hours of AMT classes and earned a 2.500 GPA in all classes are eligible for the AMT internship.  Prerequisites:  AMT 101, AMT 138, AMT 145 or AMT 101, AMT 145, MHT 255 and Department Chair approval.  6 credit hours.

 

AMT  205  Automotive Brake Systems.  Theory/Application/Service of the automotive brake systems components.  Emphasis is given to live work, diagnosis, failure analysis, and following service procedures as outlined by the manufacturer.  A component of electronic brake systems is also included.  Safety is stressed.  4 credit hours.

 

AMT  206                  Automotive Suspension and Steering. Theory/Application/Service of the automotive suspension and steering system components.  Emphasis is given to live work, diagnosis, failure analysis, and following service procedures as outlined by the manufacturer.  A component of electronic suspension systems and wheel alignment is also included.  Safety is stressed.   4 credit hours.

 

AMT  207          Heating/Air Conditioning. Theory/Application/Service of the component functions of the heating and air conditioning systems.  Emphasis is given to live work diagnosis, failure analysis, and following the proper service procedures as outlined by the manufacturers specifications.  Special emphasis is put on the proper handling of refrigerants. Safety is stressed.  5 credit hours.

 

AMT  214  Automotive Electrical/Electronics III.  Theory/Application/Service of electronic type power accessories with emphasis put on failure analysis and proper service procedures.  Special emphasis is put on accessories such as electric windows, door locks, electric seats, cruise controls, and body computers.  Will have a large component of advanced engine performance and electronic diagnostics.  Safety is stressed.  Corequisites:  AMT 101 and AMT 138 or AMT 243 with a grade of “C” or better.  9 credit hours.

 

AMT  243  Light-Duty Diesel Engines and Control Systems.  Theory, application, and service of light-duty diesel engine fuel and electronic engine management systems.  Corequisite:  AMT 101 with a grade of “C” or better.  6 credit hours.

 

AMT  253  Automotive Drivetrains and Axles.  Theory, application, and service of the components used in automotive and light truck drivertrain systems.  Emphasis is given to live work diagnosis, failure analysis, and following proper service procedures as outlined by the manufacturers specifications.  Safety is stressed.  9 credit hours.

 

AMT  262  High Performance Drivetrains.  This course teaches modification and design of engines and transmissions used in high performance vehicles.  Emphasis will be on safety, selecting proper components, and calculating vehicle demand.  Prerequisite:  AMT 145 with a grade of “C” or better.  5 credit hours.

 

AMT  265  Performance Suspension Design.  This course teaches performance suspension modifications for motorsports competition vehicles.  Prerequisites:  AMT 205 and AMT 206 with a grade of “C” or better.  5 credit hours.

 

AMT  267  Mechanical Systems and Power Accessories.  Theory/Application/Service of automobile mechanical systems as applied to collision repair.  Emphasis is placed on brake, suspension, and steering systems.  6 credit hours.

 

AMT  270  Electric/Hybrid Drive Systems.  This course teaches the theory, application, operation, and diagnosis of automotive electrical and hybrid propulsion systems.  Emphasis is on individual component operation, proper testing, and diagnosis as outlined by the manufacturer.  Safety is stressed.  Corequisite:  AMT 138 or AMT 243 with a grade of “C” or better.  6 credit hours.

 

AMT 299  Special Topics in Automotive Technology.  Special Topics in Automotive Technology (AMT) may include instruction on topics not covered in other AMT courses.  Topics covered in other AMT courses may also be covered in more depth in this special topics course.  Projects may be undertaken in any area related to the major program with credit hours determined by the level and amount of involvement.  The minimum involvement required for one credit is 30 contact hours.  The specific topic(s), objectives, plan of instruction, and evaluation criteria must be documented in the syllabus; approved by the Department/Division Chair; and filed in the Academic Records Office.  Students may complete more than one Special Topics course, provided that the credits earned in this manner do not exceed a total of four (4) credits.  1-4 credit hours.