AUTOMATION & ROBOTICS TECHNOLOGY- Curriculum and class descriptions

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Automation & Robotics Technology

The Automation & Robotics Technology program offers an engaging Advanced Manufacturing Technician education encompassing all aspects of advanced manufacturing systems.  In many industries today, and definitely in the future, electro-mechanical integration is and will be the main component of mass production.  Skilled technicians will be needed to create, install, and maintain these automated systems.  The Automation & Robotics Technology program is accredited by the Association of Technology, Management, and Applied Engineering (ATMAE).

The program prepares students for multidisciplinary, multi-skilled employment in the manufacturing sector with coursework focused on installing, calibrating, maintaining, troubleshooting, and repairing manufacturing systems.  These systems incorporate electricity, electronics, robotics, fluid power, sound safety practices, workplace organization, lean manufacturing principles, problem solving, and maintenance reliability.  This program is designed to provide students the opportunity to pursue careers as highly-skilled advanced manufacturing technicians who have the technical knowledge and abilities to perform well, communicate effectively, think critically, work in teams, and behave professionally.

Students that are sponsored by a manufacturing consortium member will receive non-credit work experience through the Advanced Manufacturing Technician consortium.  An optional eight-week internship is included in the summer semester between the first and second years that is not provided by the sponsoring manufacturing consortium.  The student will perform duties pertaining to their specific program of study.

This program is offered only in St. Charles, Missouri, at the Lewis & Clark Career Center.

A grade of “C” or better must be maintained in all courses in order to continue and graduate in the Automation & Robotics Technology program.

Program Mission

The mission of the Automation & Robotics Technology program provides students with the technical and interpersonal skills and knowledge that qualify them to work as a technician in today's automated manufacturing industries.

Program Goals

The goals of the program are to provide the opportunity for students to develop:

  • Oral and written communication skills.
  • Knowledge and skills necessary to set-up and operate manual machine tools.
  • An analytic approach to problem solving and troubleshooting.
  • Proven professionalism and safety skills required by industry standards.
  • Proven technical competency in managing and sustaining automated manufacturing systems.

CORE CURRICULUM

                                Credit Hours

MAR 100 Work Experience Mentoring and Professional Development I 2
MAR 101 Introduction to Electricity 4
MAR 102 Work Experience Mentoring and Professional Development II 2
MAR 110 Mechanical and Fluid Power Transmission 3
MAR 118 Industrial Motors and Their Controls 4
MAR 125 Applied Electronics 4
MAR 150 Machine Shop Fundamentals 4
MAR 200 Work Experience Mentoring and Professional Development III 2
MAR 201 Work Experience Mentoring and Professional Development IV 2
MAR 203 Work Experience Mentoring and Professional Development V 2
MAR 204 PLC Programming 4
MAR 206 Industrial Robotics 4
MAR 211 Theory of Industrial Automation 2
MAR 215 Introduction to Quality Control 3
MAR 221 Mechanical & Electronic Device Troubleshooting 3
Optional:    
MAR 190 Internship I (4)
SUB-TOTAL 45-49

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

General Education Requirements see page 43-44 of the college catalog

Must Include:  101/102 College Physics

May not include: ASC 104 Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab I , ASC 106 Human Anatomy and Physiology with Lab II, NST 101 Network Fundamentals.

Sub Total - 19 credit hours

     
    PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS  
DDT 135 Introductory Drafting Fundamentals 3
WLT 128 Basic Welding 3
    SUB-TOTAL 6
       
    GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS  
COM 125 Job Search Strategies 1
    SUB-TOTAL 1
       
    It is a graduation requirement of the Automation & Robotics Technology (MAR) program for students to earn a grade of “C” or better in all courses.  
       
    PROGRAM TOTAL 71-75

Class descriptions

 

MAR  100  Work Experience Mentoring and Professional Development I.  This course teaches workplace safety principles and practices necessary for advanced manufacturing technicians to work safely.  2 credit hours.

MAR  101  Introduction to Electricity.  This course introduces and develops the concepts necessary for understanding the use of electrical components and circuitry.  Technical math including scientific notation, significant figures, unit conversions, beginning algebra and basic trigonometry will be introduced and developed throughout the course.  The first half of the semester is devoted to DC, the second to AC.  Prerequisite:  Satisfactory placement score into MAT 051 or higher.  4 credit hours.

 MAR  102  Work Experience Mentoring and Professional Development II.  This course teaches workplace organization and the application of workplace safety principles and practices necessary for advanced manufacturing technicians to work safely.  Prerequisite:  MAR 100 with a grade of “C” or better.  2 credit hours.

 MAR  110  Mechanical and Fluid Power Transmission.  This course includes mechanical power transmission topics such as brakes, clutches, gears, couplings, shafts, chains and sprockets, cams and bearings.  Hydraulic items include liquid properties, cylinders, motors, pumps, valves and math for proper sizing of components.  Pneumatic items include physical principles, cylinders, motors, compressors and control valves.  Simulation of circuits will be performed before any laboratory work is done.  Laboratory exercises are provided to enhance classroom topics.  3 credit hours.

 MAR  118  Industrial Motors and their Controls.  This course introduces the students to various types of industrial motors and controls.  The student will identify, select, install/wire and troubleshoot three phase and single phase DC/AC motors and controls, including servo and stepper motors.  Laboratory exercises include designing and building control modules for machine integration.  Prerequisite:  MAR 101 with a grade of “C” or better.  4 credit hours.

MAR  125  Applied Electronics.  This course introduces and develops the concepts necessary to analyze and test both discrete and integrated circuit components.  The first half of the semester is devoted to Analog Circuits, the second to Digital Electronic.  Also includes a laboratory course with experiments designed to support this course theory.  Prerequisite:  MAR 101 with a grade of “C” or better.  4 credit hours.

MAR  150  Machine Shop Fundamentals.  This course introduces the student to mechanical blueprint reading, shop safety, bench work and layout, hand tools, measuring instruments and manual machine tools.  Technical math including fractions, unit conversions, and basic trigonometry will be introduced and developed throughout the course.  Emphasis is placed on the sequence of machining piece parts, tool selection and machine set-up and operation.  Prerequisite:  Satisfactory placement score into MAT 051 or higher. 4 credit hours.

 MAR  190  Internship I.  The internship is comprised of 320 hours of work experience in a manufacturing or laser applications setting requiring the student to perform a variety of tasks.  The student is expected to apply learned skills to be a productive employee, and the employer is expected to provide an environment that enhances the student’s exposure to the industry.  Prerequisite:  Department Chair approval.  4 credit hours.

MAR  200  Work Experience Mentoring and Professional Development III.  This course teaches lean manufacturing and the application of workplace safety principles and practices necessary for advanced manufacturing technicians to work safely.  Prerequisite:  MAR 102 with a grade of “C” or better.  2 credit hours.

MAR  201  Work Experience Mentoring and Professional Development IV.  This course introduces maintenance fundamentals and relates them to maintenance foundation experiences.  Workplace safety principles and practices necessary for advanced manufacturing technicians to work safely are reinforced.  Prerequisite:  MAR 200 with a grade of “C” or better.  2 credit hours.

MAR  203  Work Experience Mentoring and Professional Development V.  This course teaches maintenance reliability and relates it to the core manufacturing.  Workplace safety principles and practices necessary for advanced manufacturing technicians to work safely are reinforced.  Prerequisite:  MAR 201 with a grade of “C” or better.  2 credit hours.

MAR  204  PLC Programming.  This course includes a review of number systems, Programmable Logic Control addressing, use of software, system control and an in depth study of ladder logic programming.  Programming topics include:  discrete and analog inputs and outputs, internal registers and tables, editing, timers, counters, comparison functions, computational functions, data move functions, subroutines, data manipulation and sequencing functions, high speed counting, trigonometric and advanced math functions.  Laboratory exercises are provided to enhance classroom topics.   Prerequisites:  MAR 118 and MAR 125 with a grade of “C” or better.  4 credit hours.

MAR  206  Industrial Robotics.  The course is an introduction to state-of-the-art industrial robotics.  The course is focused on installation, repair and maintenance of robots and robotic manufacturing systems.  Robotic mechanisms and sensors will be reviewed along with interfacing and programming of the controls to perform intermediate manufacturing tasks.  Corequisite:  MAR 204 with a grade of “C” or better.  4 credit hours.

MAR  211  Theory of Industrial Automation.  This course includes a definition of Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) and provides a foundation for its application.  Concepts covered include manufacturing product planning, production engineering, production planning, control, and execution.  A definition of flexible manufacturing gives the student an insight into the factory of the future.  Current employment trends will be discussed.  Each student will be prepared to seek employment.  This course will be oriented toward choosing, planning for, and conducting the final project on the CIM cell.  Project Management software will be taught and utilized.  2 credit hours.

MAR  215  Introduction to Quality Control.  This course serves as an introduction to quality for students who are pursuing careers in manufacturing technology or related technical fields.  Topics include fundamentals of statistics, control chart variables and attributes, reliability, quality costs, sampling plans, and probability.  3 credit hours.

MAR  218  Computer Interfacing.  This course introduces the use of personal computers for data and control in an industrial environment.  Applications using common personal computers, "off-the-shelf" components and interfacing boards will be discussed.  Also includes a laboratory course with experiments designed to support computer interfacing.  Prerequisite:  MAR 118 with a grade of “C” or better.  3 credit hours.

MAR  221  Mechanical and Electronic Device Troubleshooting.  This course will emphasize the troubleshooting, repair, and maintenance of automation devices such as robots, CNC machining centers, positioning tables, and PLC control systems.  Students will be instructed on factory recommended procedures and will be expected to apply proper procedures to different types of industrial equipment.  Prerequisites:  MAR 118 and MAR 204 with a grade of “C” or better.  Corequisite: MAR 206 with a grade of “C” or better.  3 credit hours.

MAR 299  Special Topics in Automation & Robotics Technology.  Special Topics in Automation & Robotics Technology (MAR) may include instruction on topics not covered in other MAR courses.  Topics covered in other MAR courses may also be covered in more depth in this special topics course.  Projects may be undertaken in any area related to the major program with credit hours determined by the level and amount of involvement.  The minimum involvement required for one credit is 30 contact hours.  The specific topic(s), objectives, plan of instruction, and evaluation criteria must be documented in the syllabus; approved by the Department/Division Chair; and filed in the Academic Records Office.  Students may complete more than one Special Topics course, provided that the credits earned in this manner do not exceed a total of four (4) credits.  Prerequisite:  Department Chair approval.  1-4 credit hours.